Tag Archives: Washington D.C.

Mary Surratt signs from Lincoln assassination

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Eastern Market offers history and halibut

At Eastern Market, your job’s not your credit. You gotta pay cash for the produce. Well, that’s funny if you’re a local because Eastern Motors  used to run a commercial nonstop. Otherwise, you’re thinking I’m nuts. Anyway, Eastern Market opened … Continue reading

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Sometimes attractions are in the bank

You can’t miss the gigantic vault door in the lobby of the Courtyard Marriott Washington Convention Center on 9th and F Sts. N.W. The one-time home of Riggs Bank was built in 1891. It was quite the place with vaulted … Continue reading

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Boy Scout Memorial combines past and present

The Boy Scout represents the aspirations of all past, present, and future Scouts throughout the world. He carries a staff that has been taken from the male figure’s branch of peace. The scout wears the traditional uniform of the group … Continue reading

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Statue of Dr. Philip Jaisohn looks like the real thing

Many statues kinda, sorta, maybe look like the person. Given many of the subjects are long dead, it’s not always easy to know how striking the likeness may be. But outside the South Korean Embassy along Massachusetts Ave. is not … Continue reading

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San Martin rides tall among Latin American memorials

  When researching the story of Gen. Jose de San Martin, it sounded so much like the nearby statue of Gen. Simon Bolivar that I had to double check I was looking at the latter. No wonder their statues are … Continue reading

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The Chilean poet who became his own pen name

Neftalí Ricardo Reyes Basoalto wasn’t the first writer to use a pen name. But, not many make it their legal name. The Chilean poet who became a diplomat and politician named himself after Czech poet Jan Neruda in becoming Pablo … Continue reading

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Something different to visit for locals and tourists alike

It’s a common question from both tourists and friends – what’s something different to see in town? It’s a question I find as wide open as the ocean and as difficult to cross. A few questions come first by me. … Continue reading

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The Maine Lobsterman along the waterfront

There are no lobsters in Washington aside the ones in restaurants. Plenty of crabs from nearby Maryland, but the seven-foot statue on Sixth and Water Sts. SW along the waterfront shows a Maine waterman “pegging” lobsters by tying their claws. … Continue reading

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Gold thieves — beware the griffins

Plenty of treasure hunters come to Washington looking for riches, but the guardians are always there to protect our gold. Two Acacia Griffins protect the Acacia Mutual Life Insurance Building at 51 Louisiana Ave. N.W. in the shadow of the … Continue reading

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Handscaping U.S. Capitol grounds was visionary

Give Frederick Law Olmsted credit — he didn’t miss a thing. When landscaping the U.S. Capitol grounds in 1874, Olmstead wanted to create things that were both aesthetic and functional. The walls were low so the public could see over … Continue reading

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Update: The man with the dog on the Korean War Memorial

The Korean War Memorial’s Wall of Remembrance is often overlooked by passersby concentrating on the statues. But, it has so many great images among the 1,500 that are worth seeing. And the best is for last – the German Shepherd … Continue reading

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Two men carry another while a woman shows compassion. The Red Cross Men and Women Killed in Service statue in the Red Cross courtyard at 17th and D Sts. N.W. is the perfect example of what the organization means. The … Continue reading

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A window underseas – World War II Submarine Memorial

It is a window to nowhere and to the seven seas. The World War II Submarine Memorial honoring those who served in the “Silent Service” faces the U.S. Navy Memorial near the Lone Sailor statue. The stained-glass window with a … Continue reading

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Righting a wrong in American history

Our country has plenty of ugly moments. Slavery and the American Indian wars were the 19th century blunders that we thought were behind us. And then World War II came with the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. Suddenly, 112,000 Japanese-American … Continue reading

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The general of them all – Alexander Macomb

It’s not often you’ll see a monument with Greek, Roman and Egyptian markings, but Gen. Alexander Macomb’s 14-foot marker at Congressional Cemetery has them all. The general is surrounded by four lions paws. A sword for his military career, cross … Continue reading

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The other Taft – Robert A. Taft Memorial

Everyone knows my distant cousin William Howard Taft, the 26th U.S. president and the fattest person to ever serve in the White House. Figure I’d inherit that bloodline. But few remember his son Robert A. Taft whose accomplishments earned an … Continue reading

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Cordell Hull: Father of the United Nations

It’s strange how everyone knows President Woodrow Wilson was instrumental in the League of Nations that the U.S. never joined, but few recall the key person starting the United Nations. Cordell Hull merits only a three-foot bronze bust outside the … Continue reading

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Sky Landscape is for the 99 percenters

For everyone who was told they’re not good enough, those who spent years trying to make it, that sacrificed everything for their dream — Sky Landscape is for you. Louise Nevelson struggled for many years after arriving from Kiev, Russia. … Continue reading

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Figure for Landscape makes you figure it out

This is not a Henry Moore piece despite being next to two of the British sculptor’s works on 7th and Jefferson N.W. But, it’s the next closest thing as fellow Brit Barbara Hepworth’s “Figure for Landscape” follows Moore’s 20th century … Continue reading

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