Tag Archives: Photo by Rick Snider

Lily Pond: art for art’s sake, I guess

On this site was the first water to be piped through the streets for city residents. I’ll let you have a moment to absorb all that. The Lily Pond in John Marshall Park at 4th and C Sts. N.W. by … Continue reading

Posted in Attractions | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: The Irish Sea

Posted in Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Bugler welcome visitors to Arlington National Cemetery

The first makeover of the Arlington National Cemetery welcome center in 20 years included six large murals of scenes around the cemetery. However, the centerpiece of the room is a Taps bugler patterned after Staff Sgt. Jesse Tubb of South … Continue reading

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Congressional is still the cemetery for Congress

Congressional Cemetery was once a happening place for U.S. Senators or Congressmen to spend their eternal years. Eighty were buried there until 1870 when the sandstone centographs were deemed ugly. So the black marble stone of Stephen Joshua Solarz near … Continue reading

Posted in Memorials | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: OBX sunset

Posted in Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Veterans Affairs chief rests in Arlington National Cemetery

Coming around the corner from Joe Kennedy’s memorial marker when heading to Lee’s mansion or the Crook’s Stairs, there’s a shiny black marble marker that catches your eye. Gordan Hall Mansfield, a wounded Vietnam veteran who later served as Deputy … Continue reading

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Look up at National Archives pediment

I’m a big advocate of looking up when walking around major buildings. It’s amazing what you’re missing at street level. The Recorder of the Archives hangs above Pennsylvania Ave. Author James Goode called it “the finest sculptured pediment in Washington” … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Henry Rathbone’s house – the man next to Lincoln

The White House isn’t the only house to walk by the front door around Lafayette Park. A famous bystander to history is a few doors down. Major Henry Rathbone was in Abraham Lincoln’s box when murdered by John Wilkes Booth. … Continue reading

Posted in Abraham Lincoln | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mayor Smallwood at Congressional Cemetery

The old simple stones near the entrance of Congressional Cemetery mark one of the early prominent families of Washington who made the graveyard possible. Samuel Nicholas Smallwood was twice mayor of Washington from 1819-22 and 1824 when dying in office. … Continue reading

Posted in Memorials | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Christman stands tall in death

Sometimes I wander by a grave at Arlington National Cemetery and wonder who inspired such an interesting marker. And sometimes there’s very little information to learn. Cpl. Claude B. Christman  of the 27th U.S. Infantry was killed in Manila on … Continue reading

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The lady in white

It’s not often a statue gets center stage – twice. The Statue of Freedom lies atop the U.S. Capitol dome, but also inside the Capitol Visitors Center underneath. The statue shows the “Lady Freedom” with her right hand on a … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: DAR reading room

Posted in Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Four brothers at Arlington National Cemetery

Band of Brothers is often used beyond the famous World War II unit. But for one grave marker at Arlington National Cemetery, it’s true. The four McCullough brothers are buried together in the back of the cemetery. All served in … Continue reading

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Jefferson keeps an eye on Library of Congress

The Library of Congress across the street from the U.S. Capitol was created as a reference library for our politicians. Today, the public also uses it for research. The three buildings are grand to see with their architecture and collections. … Continue reading

Posted in Attractions | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: Atop the DAR

Posted in Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Seabees Monument stands ready for action

The toughest men of World War II might have been the Navy Seabees. Created in March 1942 to construct whatever was needed in World War II, the “Construction Builders” were known as “CBs” and hence Seabees. These guys could build … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

John Carroll still overseeing his campus

Bishop John Carroll grew up in Upper Marlboro, Md., educated in Europe and returned to become the leader of American Catholics and establish Georgetown University. Why do students put toilet seats under the bronze statue on campus and place jack-o-lanters … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: DAR staircase

Posted in Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Off The Record – for a drink

Some new folks to town wanted to see the sights . . . and some bars. So, why not start with Off The Record at the Hay Adams Hotel? It’s a little tricky to find, which is probably how some … Continue reading

Posted in Washington life | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A walk in a French forest . . . kinda

Most people walk through Meridian House and come away impressed with the shear size of the Beaux Arts mansion designed by the renowned John Russell Pope in 1919. Me – I liked the trees in the back. U.S. ambassador Irwin … Continue reading

Posted in Attractions | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment