Tag Archives: Best Washington DC walking tours

Final salute for the Sergeant at Arms

The simple white marker surrounded by a small black metal fence shows someone special lies below in the center of Congressional Cemetery. Montjoy Bayly was more than a captain in the 7th regiment of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary … Continue reading

Posted in Memorials | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Congressional Cemetery: an overlooked jewel

After driving past Congressional Cemetery countless times, I finally decided to tour it. Maybe it was the abundant street parking that convinced me, but what a jewel I’ve been missing. The 35-acre cemetery on Capitol Hill was established in 1807 … Continue reading

Posted in Memorials | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: Three Soldiers Statue at Vietnam Wall

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Summerhouse been a quenching respite since 1880

Where can you go for a drink around the U.S. Capitol? Well, since 1880 or so The Summerhouse has always offered refreshment. Water, that is. The hexagonal red brick building on the west lawn of the Senate side has a … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: Kennedy Center balcony

Posted in Washington life | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Remembering the life of a child

The death of a child is certainly heartbreaking. It often makes for interesting memorials. Alice May Parker died in 1861 at age 12 of typhoid fever. At Congressional Cemetery, a praying angel the size of a child prays over her … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Olive Risley Seward: The lady was a daughter

On the edge of Seward Square is a statue of a Victorian woman looking at the grassy area. Turns out it’s a long story and a good one. William Seward was Secretary of State who not only bought Alaska for … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: Second amendment rally on Capitol Hill

Posted in Wordless Wednesday | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Upright Motive No. 1: Glenkiln Cross

It’s the accidental sculpture. The original lies on a hilltop on the Glenkiln Farm Estate in Scotland where a shepherd once oversaw his flock. British sculptor Henry Moore made the 11-foot tall bronze cross with a small crosspiece near the … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Sir John Dill worth stopping for a breather

When first becoming a guide, I wasn’t the tip-top physical specimen before you today (kidding) and needed a quick breather when walking people up to the Tomb of the Unknowns. If you don’t split to the right to see John … Continue reading

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

My 1,000th post

Eight years ago, I started this blog as a new tour guide. It chronicles much of what I learn and see as a tour guide in my hometown of Washington, D.C. And this is post No. 1,000. Wow, where does … Continue reading

Posted in Washington life | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Lobsterman gets a new spot

Sometimes you have to change fishing grounds, and in this case a new dock. The Maine waterman, nicknamed the Lobsterman, has been moved as part of the new SW Waterfront from Sixth and Waters Sts. to the Fish Market at … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Ahoy there – stop by the U.S. Navy Memorial

Washington has many wonderful fountains. The World War II Memorial’s may be the best at night. The Library of Congress’ Court of Neptune is akin to Rome’s Trevi Fountain. The ones on the sides of the U.S. Capitol are interesting. … Continue reading

Posted in Memorials | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Washington Hilton: Where Ronald Reagan was shot

President Ronald Reagan was exiting the Washington Hilton hotel after speaking to a group when a man hoping to impress actress Jodie Foster fired a shot on March 30, 1981. John Hinckley fired six shots, including one that deflected off … Continue reading

Posted in Washington life | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Masonic Temple worth visiting for George Washington fans

I’ve seen the Masonic Temple in the distance all of my life and only been near it twice to realize it’s a pretty big place. Finally, my wife said let’s go see it. I’m willing to try any place with … Continue reading

Posted in Memorials | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: World War II Memorial

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Arlington National marker tells its own story

Arlington National Cemetery folks like to say every grave has a story. This time, the grave marker tells the story. Sergt. Edwin W. Wall, says the granite marker near the mast of the Maine behind the Tomb of the Unknowns, … Continue reading

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Wordless Wednesday: Tidal Basin overflows at Jefferson

Posted in Washington life | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Two-Piece Reclining Figure is one different approach

That Henry Moore was quite a character. The British sculptor’s “Two-Piece Reclining Figure” by the Hirshhorn Sculpture Gardens on 7th and Jefferson N.W. is one of 7 bronze copies that is supposed to be someone lying down. You may have … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A rebel becomes a liberator – José Eloy Alfaro Delgado

José Eloy Alfaro Delgado (June 25, 1842 – January 28, 1912) was Ecuador’s president from 1895-1901 and 1906-11. A leader in the Liberal Revolution of 1895, “Viejo Luchador” (Old Warrior) created national unity, secured its borders and brought new transportation … Continue reading

Posted in Monuments and Statues | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment