San Martin rides tall among Latin American memorials

 

When researching the story of Gen. Jose de San Martin, it sounded so much like the nearby statue of Gen. Simon Bolivar that I had to double check I was looking at the latter. No wonder their statues are near each other.

San Martin was the founder of Argentine independence who later helped free Chile and Peru from Spanish rule, too. He even met with Bolivar, who was liberating other South American countries, though the two opted not to work together.

San Martin was born into a wealthy family, was educated in Spain while spending 28 years there. He even served in Spain’s military against Napoleon while rising to Lt. Colonel. Ironically, the Freemason also opposed Spain’s government and joined revolutionary forces in Buenos Aires in 1812. In a fete worthy of Hannibal, San Martin led forces across the highest Andes peak to defeat Spanish forces. He later resigned his commission and went into exile before dying in 1850.

The bronze statue was dedicated by U.S. President Calvin Coolidge in 1922 in Judiciary Square. It was moved in 1970 for what’s now the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, but rededicated in 1976 at Virginia Ave. and 21st. St. N.W.

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